University of California, Berkeley (A2CARES) Consortium Name: American and Asian Centers for Arboviral Research and Enhanced Surveillance (A2CARES)
Pathogen Focus: Chikungunya Virus, Dengue Virus, SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19), and Zika Virus

The American and Asian Centers for Arboviral Research and Enhanced Surveillance (A2CARES) assembles a consortium of world-renowned investigators in arbovirology, epidemiology, immunology, viral diagnostics, phylogenetics, and clinical research, while leveraging research infrastructure and expertise in the performance of long-term cohort and hospital-based studies. This consortium has resulted from decades of collaborative international research and extensive experience in preparing for and responding to outbreaks in close collaboration with local and international health authorities and NIAID. With sites at key locations in Asia (Sri Lanka) and the Americas (Nicaragua, Ecuador, US), this consortium will utilize innovative molecular and serological methods not only to monitor and identify emerging pathogens but also to address fundamental questions in the epidemiology of dengue and other arboviral diseases and to identify viral, host and environmental determinants of differences between sites along a gradient of urbanicity.

The overarching goals of A2CARES are to develop an interconnected, harmonized network of clinical and laboratory sites to strengthen research programs, compare disease epidemiology and severity in different geographic regions, develop and implement cutting-edge diagnostic methods, and respond efficiently and effectively to outbreaks. A2CARES will advance toward this overall goal by establishing standardized hospital studies and community-based cohorts at its research sites to characterize and compare human arboviral illnesses across sites and developing the infrastructure to rapidly respond to epidemics in collaboration with the Ministries of Health. To capture potential emerging pathogens, A2CARESs further includes outbreak investigation, surveillance of non-human primates, and vector incrimination.

  • This Research Center is supported by the National Institute Of Allergy And Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number 1U01AI15178
Eva Harris Multiple Principal Investigator (Contact) University of California, Berkeley Read Bio
Josefina Coloma Multiple Principal Investigator University of California, Berkeley Read Bio

University of Texas Medical Branch (CREATE-NEO) Consortium Name: Coordinating Research on Emerging Arboviral Threats Encompassing the Neotropics (CREATE-NEO)
Pathogen Focus: Chikungunya Virus, Dengue Virus, Mayaro Virus, Yellow Fever Virus, and Zika Virus

The Coordinating Research on Emerging Arboviral Threats Encompassing the Neotropics (CREATE-NEO) project will combine arbovirus surveillance across Central and South America with predictive modeling efforts to better anticipate and counter arbovirus emergence. CREATE-NEO will forewarn local, regional, and global public health agencies of arboviruses within Central and South America that pose particularly high risk of spillover, emergence into transmission among humans, and/or international spread. CREATE-NEO will also build local capacity to detect, predict, and respond to emerging arboviruses at their point of origin, which will maximize the potential to avoid full-blown viral emergence. Importantly, CREATE-NEO can quickly redirect to address any emerging animal to human or biological vector-borne disease.

  • This Research Center is supported by the National Institute Of Allergy And Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number U01AI151807
Nikos Vasilakis Principal Investigator (Contact) University of Texas Medical Branch Read Bio
Kathryn A. Hanley Co-Principal Investigator New Mexico State University Read Bio

Washington State University (CREID-ECA) Consortium Name: Center for Research in Emerging Infectious Diseases-East and Central Africa (CREID-ECA)
Pathogen Focus: MERS-CoV and Rift Valley Fever Virus

The CREID-ECA is located within the Washington State University (WSU) global health program in Nairobi, Kenya and overseen by an international team. The Center will use existing and new field sites established at human-animal-environment interfaces to conduct systematic pathogen discovery, and investigate the maintenance and transmission of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). To support the response to recurrent outbreaks of infectious diseases (EIDs) in the regions, the Center will rapidly characterize novel pathogens and provide rapid diagnostics. The Center will build and cultivate links with national and regional outbreak response agencies with the goal of supporting timely epidemiologic and socio-cultural studies designed to identify and characterize causes, magnitude, scope and risk factors of infection; thereby strengthening responses to outbreaks and their optimal control. Our ultimate goal is to collect and translate data that provides needed evidence to minimize spread and burden of outbreak-associated pathogens. We will conduct the initial RVFV and MERS-CoV studies in five sites located in Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC).

  • This Research Center is supported by the National Institute Of Allergy And Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number U01AI151799
M. Kariuki Njenga Principal Investigator Washington State University, Kenya Read Bio
Robert Breiman Co-Principal Investigator and Outbreak Response Lead Emory University Read Bio

Washington University in St. Louis (CREID-ESP) Consortium Name: Center for Research in Emerging Infectious Disease-Epidemiology, Surveillance, Pathogenesis
Pathogen Focus: MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19)

The Center for Research in Emerging Infectious Disease-Epidemiology, Surveillance, Pathogenesis (CREID-ESP) at Washington University in St. Louis will focus on surveillance of key disease symptoms such as respiratory disease, inflammation of the brain, and fever of unknown origin, that have frequently been observed in association with emerging viruses in the past few decades. Surveillance of animal and insect vectors will also be performed to identify origin points and define transmission patterns associated with novel emerging viruses. The Center includes four international surveillance sites located in China, Hong Kong, Nepal, and Ethiopia. These sites have an established history of studying viral emergence or possess the high capability to monitor potential future events. The Center will initially prioritize research efforts on Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) and SARS-CoV-2 research. In addition to conducting virus surveillance, the Center will develop new substances to carry out lab and diagnostic tests to characterize virus epidemiology and pathogenic potential. These efforts will establish and validate the critical infrastructure necessary to respond to new emerging infectious diseases. In the event of a new outbreak, efforts will be reprioritized, in consultation with NIAID, to focus on response to the new emerging threat. To achieve these goals, the Center has assembled a unique, international team with complementary expertise in public health, disease surveillance, virus discovery, genomics, bioinformatics, virology, molecular biology, immunology, diagnostic development, and animal model development.

  • This Research Center is supported by the National Institute Of Allergy And Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number U01AI151810
David Wang Principal Investigator Washington University in St. Louis Read Bio
Jacco Boon Co-Investigator Washington University in St. Louis Read Bio
Michael Diamond Co-Investigator Washington University in St. Louis Read Bio
Scott Handley Data Management Lead Washington University in St. Louis Read Bio
Malik Peiris Co-Investigator Hong Kong University Read Bio
Leo Poon Co-Investigator Hong Kong University Read Bio
Sujan Shresta Nepal Site Coordinator La Jolla Institute Immunology Read Bio
Krishna Manandhar Co-Investigator Tribhuvan University
Feyesa Regassa Co-Investigator Ethiopia Public Health Institute
Huanyu Wang Co-Investigator China CDC Read Bio
Guodong Liang Co-Investigator China CDC Read Bio

University of California, Davis (EEIDI) Consortium Name: EpiCenter for Emerging Infectious Disease Intelligence (EEIDI)
Pathogen Focus: Arboviruses, Coronaviruses, and Filoviruses

The Epicenter for Emerging Infectious Disease Intelligence brings together a consortium of leading research institutions to advance an understanding of viral emergence from wildlife in forests and rapidly urbanizing environments. The work will enhance preparedness for disease emergence events in the Congo and Amazon Basin forest regions and support response efforts at the source of emergence. The multidisciplinary team has expertise in infectious disease epidemiology, human and animal health, virology, medical entomology, disease modeling, and capacity strengthening. Activities will include integrating human, animal, and vector surveillance to enable insights into cross-species disease transmission and facilitating responsiveness to evolving needs that impact country, regional, and global emerging infectious disease risk. In the Epicenter’s initial work, the team will investigate the epidemiology of arboviruses and filoviruses, which include emerging viruses currently threatening global health security. To evaluate disease transmission dynamics at the initial emergence in humans, surveillance will be conducted in forest communities at the point of virus spillover from contact with wildlife and mosquitos. The EpiCenter team will also investigate these viruses in the second stage of emergence, in urban centers peripherally connected to forests, where viruses have adapted to human-to-human transmission (by direct or vector-borne transmission). As part of the CREID Network, this work will advance an understanding of cross-species transmission dynamics for emerging viral threats, as well as optimize innovative and deployable surveillance and testing strategies to strengthen infectious disease surveillance to enable rapid response to outbreaks.

  • This Research Center is supported by the National Institute Of Allergy And Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number 1U01AI151814
Christine K. Johnson Principal Investigator (Contact) University of California, Davis Read Bio
Tierra Smiley Evans Co-Principal Investigator University of California, Davis Read Bio
Lark Coffey Co-Principal Investigator University of California, Davis Read Bio
Christopher Barker Co-Principal Investigator University of California, Davis Read Bio
Amy Morrison Co-Principal Investigator University of California, Davis Read Bio
Mariana Leguia Co-Principal Investigator Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú Read Bio

Institut Pasteur (PICREID) Consortium Name: Pasteur International Center for Research on Emerging Infectious Diseases (PICREID)
Pathogen Focus: Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus, Dengue Virus, and Rift Valley Fever Virus

Pasteur International Center for Research on Emerging Infectious Diseases (PICREID) takes an inter-continental One Health approach designed to improve the capacity to respond rapidly and effectively to outbreaks. PICREID identifies factors influencing emergence and transmission at the virus, vector, and reservoir level leading to epidemics in suspected spillover conditions. The consortium concentrates on high priority RNA viruses with epidemic potential in Africa (Rift Valley Fever virus (RVFV), Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus (CCHFV)) and in Southeast Asia (dengue virus (DENV)), as well as viruses (Disease X) identified from symptomatic surveillance or vector sampling.

PICREID focuses on significant needs in their study of these pathogens, including: 1) harmonizing pathogen identification and diagnostic tools; 2) improving existing diagnostic tools with more rapid, efficient, and specific point-of-need tools for better response to an outbreak in remote areas, including unknown viruses; 3) refining understanding on the prevalence, transmission, and adaptation of pathogens in humans, animal reservoirs, and insect vectors in specific environments; and 4) improving knowledge of disease pathogenesis and immune responses in hosts leading to drug/vaccine development.

  • This Research Center is supported by the National Institute Of Allergy And Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number U01AI151758
Anavaj Sakuntabhai Principal Investigator Institut Pasteur Read Bio
Kelly Prifti Project Manager Institut Pasteur
Tineke Cantaert Point of Contact, Cambodia Site Institut Pasteur of Cambodia Read Bio
Gamou Fall Point of Contact, Senegal Site Institut Pasteur of Dakar
Serge Alain Sadeuh-Mba Point of Contact, Cameroon Site Centre Pasteur of Cameroon Read Bio
Etienne Simon-Loriere Bioinformatics Lead and Point of Contact for Paris Site Institut Pasteur Read Bio

University of Washington (UWARN) Consortium Name: United World Antiviral Research Network (UWARN)
Pathogen Focus: Arboviruses and SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19)

UWARN United World Antiviral Research Network

The United World Antiviral Research Network (UWARN) at the University of Washington is collaborating with partners in Brazil, Pakistan, Senegal, South Africa, and Taiwan to focus on emerging and re-emerging arboviruses as well as COVID. UWARN laboratories will study high-burden viral pathogens such as Zika, dengue, and chikungunya, and emerging and re-emerging flavi-, alpha-, and bunyaviruses including Mayaro, Usutu, Rift Valley fever, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, and Oropouche. The global public health emergency caused by Zika virus in 2014-2016 highlighted several important gaps in scientific knowledge regarding arboviruses. These included problems with non-specific diagnostics, the absence of effective antiviral vaccines and therapeutics, and limited understanding of the development of resulting medical conditions such as microcephaly. UWARN is fully equipped to overcome previous scientific gaps for the next arboviral or really an emerging infectious diseases emergency. The UWARN partnership will combine investigations into arboviral natural immune responses, the development of neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies, and the development of de novo engineered arboviral detection protein systems to better understand disease development, develop more specific diagnostics, and downstream therapeutics. UWARN is also prepared to detect emerging viruses in human and animal populations as well as vectors using a One Health approach.

  • This Research Center is supported by the National Institute Of Allergy And Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number 1U01AI151698
Wesley C. Van Voorhis Principal Investigator University of Washington Read Bio
Judy Wasserheit Co-Principal Investigator University of Washington Read Bio
Peter Rabinowitz Co-Principal Investigator University of Washington Read Bio COHR
Michael Gale Co-Principal Investigator University of Washington Read Bio Gale Lab CIIID
Geoff Gottlieb Co-Investigator University of Washington Read Bio
Alex Greninger Co-Investigator University of Washington Read Bio

University of Texas Medical Branch (WAC-EID) Consortium Name: West African Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases (WAC-EID)
Pathogen Focus: Chikungunya Virus, Dengue Virus, Ebola Virus, Lassa Virus, MERS Co-V, Nipah Virus, Yellow Fever Virus, and Zika Virus

West African Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases

The West African Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases (WAC-EID) will address critical scientific gaps through field studies of animal to human disease transmission and clinical studies of human exposure with resulting disease outcome. The Center will focus on surveillance of humans, mosquitoes and ticks, and wild animals including bats, which are likely hosts of filoviruses, coronaviruses, and henipaviruses. These efforts will possibly identify new emerging viruses and produce risk maps for human exposure. The infrastructure and local expertise developed through projects in Senegal, Sierra Leone, and Nigeria, along with biosafety and biosecurity training and improved diagnostics, will also prepare the region for future outbreaks of emerging viral and other infectious diseases. Research conducted in the Center will increase mechanistic understanding of animal to human viral maintenance and emergence, causes of fever and hemorrhagic diseases, diverse disease outcomes, and risks for local and international disease spread. Novel viruses with emergence potential will likely be discovered through clinical surveillance of animal hosts and vectors. The strengthening of existing collaborations between the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) and its partners in Senegal, Sierra Leone, and Nigeria will support a West African network of emerging viral disease laboratories and hospitals prepared to respond quickly and effectively to future outbreaks.

  • This Research Center is supported by the National Institute Of Allergy And Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number 1U01AI151801
Scott Weaver Principal Investigator University of Texas Medical Branch Read Bio
Robert Cross Co-Investigator University of Texas Medical Branch Read Bio
George Golovko Co-Investigator University of Texas Medical Branch Read Bio
Susan McLellan Co-Investigator University of Texas Medical Branch Read Bio
Slobodan Paessler Co-Investigator University of Texas Medical Branch Read Bio
Andrew Routh Co-Investigator University of Texas Medical Branch Read Bio
Pei-Yong Shi Co-Investigator University of Texas Medical Branch Read Bio
Caroline Weldon Program Manager University of Texas Medical Branch

Scripps Research Institute (WAEIDRC) Consortium Name: West African Emerging Infectious Disease Research Center (WAEIDRC)
Pathogen Focus: Lassa Virus and SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19)

The West African Emerging Infectious Disease Research Center (WAEIDRC) is a team of clinicians, epidemiologists, bioinformaticians, and biologists in the United States, Sierra Leone, Nigeria, Liberia, and Senegal who conduct pathogen/host surveillance, study pathogen transmission and evolution, and study disease development and immune responses in the host. The research center is working to develop new substances to carry out lab and diagnostic tests for improved detection of emerging pathogens, based on previous experience developing rapid diagnostic tests, CRISPR-based assays, metagenomic sequencing, and computational tools. By combining active surveillance, capacity building, and technology development, the Center aims to mitigate the effects of future pandemic threats.

  • This Research Center is supported by the National Institute Of Allergy And Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number U01AI151812
Kristian G. Andersen Multiple Principal Investigator (Contact) Scripps Research Institute Read Bio
Robert F. Garry Multiple Principal Investigator Tulane University Read Bio
Pardis Sabeti Multiple Principal Investigator Broad Institute Read Bio
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